Redirects

Managing redirection rules is a common requirement for web applications, especially in cases where you do not want to lose incoming links that have changed or been removed over time. You can manage redirection rules on your Platform.sh projects in two different ways, which we describe here. If neither of these options satisfy your redirection needs, you can still implement redirects directly from within your application, which if implemented with the appropriate caching headers would be almost as efficient as using the configuration options provided by Platform.sh.

Whole-route redirects

Using whole-route redirects, you can define very basic routes in your .platform/routes.yaml file whose sole purpose is to redirect. A typical use case for this type of route is adding or removing a www. prefix to your domain, as the following example shows:

http://{default}/:
    type: redirect
    to: http://www.{default}/

Another use case is redirecting the requests to HTTPS:

http://{default}/:
    type: redirect
    to: https://{default}/

note In case of only having HTTPS routes defined in .platform/routes.yaml, Platform.sh would generate HTTP routes that reply HTTP 301 redirect to the corresponding HTTPS route.

Partial redirects

In the .platform/routes.yaml file you can also add partial redirect rules to existing routes:

http://{default}/:
  # [...]
  redirects:
    expires: 1d
    paths:
      "/from": { "to": "http://example.com/" }
      "/regexp/(.*)/matching": { "to": "http://example.com/$1", regexp: true }

This format is more rich and works with any type of route, including routes served directly by the application.

Two keys are available under redirects:

  • expires: optional, the duration the redirect will be cached. Examples of valid values include 3600s, 1d, 2w, 3m.
  • paths: the paths to apply redirections to.

Each rule under paths is defined by its key describing the expression to match against the request path and a value object describing both the destination to redirect to with detail on how to handle the redirection. The value object is defined with the following keys:

  • to: required, a relative URL - "/destination", or absolute URL - "http://example.com/".
  • regexp: optional, defaults to false. Specifies whether the path key should be interpreted as a PCRE regular expression. In the following example, a request to http://example.com/regexp/a/b/c/match would redirect to http://example.com/a/b/c:

    http://{default}/:
      type: upstream
      redirects:
        paths:
          "/regexp/(.*)/match":
             to: "http://example.com/$1"
             regexp: true
    
  • prefix: optional, specifies whether we should redirect both the path and all its children or just the path itself. Defaults to true, but not supported if regexp is true. For example,

    http://{default}/:
      type: upstream
      redirects:
        paths:
          "/from":
             to: "http://{default}/to"
             prefix: true
    

    with prefix set to true, /from will redirect to /to and /from/another/path will redirect to /to/another/path. If prefix is set to false then /from will trigger a redirect, but /from/another/path will not.

  • append_suffix: optional, determines if the suffix is carried over with the redirect. Defaults to true, but not supported if regexp is true or if prefix is false. If we redirect with append_suffix set to false, for example, then the following

    http://{default}/:
      type: upstream
      redirects:
        paths:
          "/from":
             to: "http://{default}/to"
             append_suffix: false
    

    would result in /from/path/suffix redirecting to just /to. If append_suffix was left on its default value of true, then /from/path/suffix would have redirected to /to/path/suffix.

  • code: optional, HTTP status code. Valid status codes are 301, 302, 307, and 308. Defaults to 302.

  • expires: optional, the duration the redirect will be cached for. Defaults to the expires value defined directly under the redirects key, but at this level we can fine-tune the expiration of individual partial redirects:

    http://{default}/:
      type: upstream
      redirects:
        expires: 1d
        paths:
          "/from": { "to": "http://example.com/" }
          "/here": { "to": "http://example.com/there", "expires": "2w" }
    

    In this example, redirects from /from would be set to expire in one day, but redirects from /here would expire in two weeks.

Application-driven redirects

If neither of the above options satisfy your redirection needs, you can still implement redirects directly in your application. If sent with the appropriate caching headers, this is nearly as efficient as implementing the redirect through one of the two configurations described above. Implementing application-driven redirects depends on your own code or framework and is beyond the scope of this documentation.

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