Platform.sh User Documentation

Vault key management service

Upsun Beta

Access our newest offering - Upsun!

Get your free trial by clicking the link below.

Get your Upsun free trial

The Vault key management service (KMS) provides key management and access control for your secrets. The Platform.sh Vault KMS offers the transit secrets engine to sign, verify, encrypt, decrypt, and rewrap information.

Vault doesn’t store the data sent to the transit secrets engine, so it can be viewed as encryption as a service. To store secrets such as API keys, create sensitive environment variables.

Supported versions Anchor to this heading

You can select the major and minor version.

Patch versions are applied periodically for bug fixes and the like. When you deploy your app, you always get the latest available patches.

Grid Dedicated Gen 3 Dedicated Gen 2
  • 1.12
  • 1.12
  • 1.6

Add Vault Anchor to this heading

1. Configure the service Anchor to this heading

To define the service, use the vault-kms type:

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
<SERVICE_NAME>:

    type: vault-kms:<VERSION>
    disk: 512
    configuration:
        endpoints:
            <ENDPOINT_ID>:
                - policy: <POLICY>
                  key: <KEY_NAME>
                  type: <ENDPOINT_TYPE>

Note that changing the name of the service replaces it with a brand new service and all existing data is lost. Back up your data before changing the service.

  • SERVICE_NAME is the name you choose to identify the service.

  • VERSION is a supported version of the service.

  • ENDPOINT_ID is an identifier you choose for the endpoint.

  • KEY_NAME is the name of the key to be stored in the Vault KMS.

  • POLICY is one of the available policies based on what you want to accomplish.

  • The type is one of:

    • sign: for signing payloads, with the type ecdsa-p256
    • encrypt (for encryptchacha20-poly1305).

    The type can’t be changed after creation.

You can create multiple endpoints, such as to have key management separate from key use.

512 MB is the minimum required disk space for the Vault KMS service.

2. Add the relationship Anchor to this heading

To define the relationship, use the endpoint you defined in step 1 :

.platform.app.yaml
# Relationships enable access from this app to a given service.
relationships:
    <RELATIONSHIP_NAME>: "<SERVICE_NAME>:<ENDPOINT_ID>"

You can define <SERVICE_NAME> and <RELATIONSHIP_NAME> as you like, but it’s best if they’re distinct. With this definition, the application container now has access to the service via the relationship <RELATIONSHIP_NAME>.

If you split the service into multiple endpoints, define multiple relationships.

Example Configuration Anchor to this heading

Service definition Anchor to this heading

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
vault-kms:
    type: vault-kms:1.12
    disk: 512
    configuration:
        endpoints:
            manage_keys:
                - policy: admin
                  key: vault-sign
                  type: sign
                - policy: sign
                  key: vault-sign
                  type: sign
                - policy: verify
                  key: vault-sign
                  type: sign

App configuration Anchor to this heading

.platform.app.yaml
relationships:
    vault_service: "vault-kms:manage_keys"

Multiple endpoints example Anchor to this heading

Service definition Anchor to this heading

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
vault-kms:
    type: vault-kms:1.12
    disk: 512
    configuration:
        endpoints:
            management:
                - policy: admin
                  key: admin-key
                  type: sign
            sign_and_verify:
                - policy: sign
                  key: signing-key
                  type: sign
                - policy: verify
                  key: signing-key
                  type: sign

App configuration Anchor to this heading

.platform.app.yaml
relationships:
    vault_manage: "vault-kms:management"
    vault_sign: "vault-kms:sign_and_verify"

Use Vault KMS Anchor to this heading

To connect your app to the Vault KMS, use a token that’s defined in the PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable. With this token for authentication, you can use any of the policies you defined in your .platform/services.yaml file.

Note that the information about the relationship can change when an app is redeployed or restarted or the relationship is changed. So your apps should only rely on the PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable directly rather than hard coding any values.

The following examples use cURL as an example, which you could do in a hook or after accessing your app with SSH. Adapt the examples for your app’s language.

Get the token Anchor to this heading

To make any calls to the Vault KMS, you need your token. Get it from the PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable:

echo $PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS | base64 --decode | jq -r ".SERVICE_NAME[0].password"

SERVICE_NAME is the name you defined in your .platform.app.yaml file.

The -r flag returns the string itself, not wrapped in quotes.

You can also store this as a variable:

VAULT_TOKEN=$(echo $PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS | base64 --decode | jq -r ".SERVICE_NAME[0].password")

A given token is valid for one year from its creation.

Get the right URL Anchor to this heading

The PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable also contains the information you need to construct a URL for contacting the Vault KMS: the host and port.

Assign it to a variable as follows:

VAULT_URL=$(echo $PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS | base64 --decode | jq -r ".SERVICE_NAME[0].host"):$(echo $PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS | base64 --decode | jq -r ".SERVICE_NAME[0].port")

SERVICE_NAME is the name you defined in your .platform.app.yaml file.

Manage your keys Anchor to this heading

Your key names are defined in your .platform/services.yaml file. You can manage them if you’ve set an admin policy for them.

To get information on a key, such as its expiration date, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://"$VAULT_URL"/v1/transit/keys/"$KEY_NAME" | jq .

$KEY_NAME is the name in your .platform/services.yaml file.

To rotate the version of your key, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://"$VAULT_URL"/v1/transit/keys/"$KEY_NAME">/rotate \
  --request POST

Sign and verify payloads Anchor to this heading

If you’ve set sign and verify policies, you can use your keys to sign and verify various payloads, such as a JSON Web Token (JWT) for authentication in your app. Note that all payloads (all plaintext data) must be base64-encoded.

To sign a specific payload, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://$VAULT_URL/v1/transit/sign/"$KEY_NAME"/sha2-512 \
  --data "{\"input\": \"$(echo SECRET | base64)\"}"

The string at the end of the URL denotes the specific hash algorithm used by the Vault KMS.

You get back a JSON object that includes the signature for the payload:

{
  "request_id": "a58b549f-1356-4028-d191-4c9cd585ca25",
  ...
  "data": {
    "key_version": 1,
    "signature": "vault-kms:v1:MEUCIAiN4UtXh..."
  },
  ...
}

You can then use data.signature to sign things such as a JWT.

To verify a payload, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://"$VAULT_URL"/v1/transit/verify/"$KEY_NAME"/sha2-512 \
  --data "
{
  \"input\": \"$(echo SECRET | base64)\",
  \"signature\": \"$SIGNATURE\"
}"

You get back a JSON object that includes whether or not the signature is valid:

{
  "request_id": "5b624718-fd9d-37f6-8b95-b387379d2648",
  ...
  "data": {
    "valid": true
  },
  ...
}

A true value means the signature matches and a false value means it doesn’t.

Encrypt and decrypt data Anchor to this heading

If you’ve set encrypt and decrypt policies, you can use your keys to encrypt and decrypt any data you want. Note that all of plaintext data you work with must be base64-encoded.

To sign a specific payload, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://$VAULT_URL/v1/transit/encrypt/"$KEY_NAME" \
  --data "{\"plaintext\": \"$(echo SECRET | base64)\"}"

You get back a JSON object that includes your encrypted data:

{
  "request_id": "690d634a-a4fb-bdd6-9947-e895578b79d5",
  ...
  "data": {
    "ciphertext": "vault-kms:v1:LEtOWSwh3N...",
    "key_version": 1
  },
  ...
}

To decrypt data that you’ve already encrypted, run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://"$VAULT_URL"/v1/transit/decrypt/"$KEY_NAME" \
  --data "
{
  \"ciphertext\": \"$CIPHERTEXT\"
}"

You get back a JSON object that your decrypted data base64-encoded:

{
  "request_id": "bbd411ca-6ed7-aa8b-8177-0f35055ce613",
  ...
  "data": {
    "plaintext": "U0VDUkVUCg=="
  },
  ...
}

To get the value un-encoded, add | jq -r ".data.plaintext" | base64 -d to the end of the curl command.

Rewrap encrypted data Anchor to this heading

If you have already encrypted data and you have changed your key version, you can rewrap the encrypted data with the new key.

Assuming $CIPHERTEXT stores your encrypted data (vault:v1:LEtOWSwh3N...), run the following command:

curl \
  --header "X-Vault-Token: $VAULT_TOKEN" \
  http://"$VAULT_URL"/v1/transit/rewrap/"$KEY_NAME" \
  --data "
{
  \"ciphertext\": \"$CIPHERTEXT\"
}"

In the JSON object that’s returned, you can notice that the ciphertext is different (and now includes the new key version as a prefix) as is the key_version:

{
  ...
  "data": {
    "ciphertext": "vault-kms:v2:ICRi0yAlH...",
    "key_version": 2
  },
  ...
}

Relationship reference Anchor to this heading

Example information available through the PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable or by running platform relationships.

Note that the information about the relationship can change when an app is redeployed or restarted or the relationship is changed. So your apps should only rely on the PLATFORM_RELATIONSHIPS environment variable directly rather than hard coding any values.

{
    "username": "",
    "scheme": "http",
    "service": "vault-kms",
    "fragment": "",
    "ip": "169.254.196.95",
    "hostname": "ckmpv2fz7jtdmpkmrun7yfgut4.vault-kms.service._.eu-3.platformsh.site",
    "port": 8200,
    "cluster": "rjify4yjcwxaa-master-7rqtwti",
    "host": "vault-kms.internal",
    "rel": "sign",
    "path": "\/",
    "query": {
        "is_master": true
    },
    "password": "ChangeMe",
    "type": "vault-kms:1.12",
    "public": false,
    "host_mapped": false
}

Policies Anchor to this heading

Policy Endpoint Capabilities Purpose
admin transit/keys/${KEY} read Access to key properties and various functions performed on keys such as rotation and deletion
transit/keys/${KEY}/* read, create, update, delete
sign transit/sign/${KEY}/${HASH_ALGORITHM} read, update Signing payloads with an existing key
verify transit/verify/${KEY}/${HASH_ALGORITHM} read, update Verifying already signed payloads
encrypt transit/encrypt/${KEY} read, update Encrypting data with an existing key
decrypt transit/decrypt/${KEY} read, update Decrypting data with an existing key
rewrap transit/rewrap/${KEY} read, update Re-encrypting data with a new key version without revealing the secret

Is this page helpful?