Platform.sh User Documentation

Network Storage

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Platform.sh supports internal “storage as a service” to provide a file store that can be shared between different application containers.

The network storage service enables a new kind of mount that refers to a shared service rather than to a local directory. Your apps can use any combination of local and service mounts.

Supported versions Anchor to this heading

You can select the major and minor version.

Patch versions are applied periodically for bug fixes and the like. When you deploy your app, you always get the latest available patches.

Grid Dedicated Gen 3 Dedicated Gen 2
  • 2.0
  • 2.0
None available

This service is the Platform.sh network storage implementation, not the version of a third-party application.

Deprecated versions Anchor to this heading

The following versions are deprecated. They’re available, but they aren’t receiving security updates from upstream and aren’t guaranteed to work. They’ll be removed in the future, so migrate to one of the supported versions.

Grid Dedicated Gen 3 Dedicated Gen 2
  • 1.0
None available

Usage example Anchor to this heading

1. Configure the service Anchor to this heading

To define the service, use the network-storage type:

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
<SERVICE_NAME>:

    type: network-storage:<VERSION>
    disk: 256

<SERVICE_NAME> must be RFC 1123 compliant, and as such it must:

  • Contain at most 63 characters
  • Contain only lowercase alphanumeric characters or - (underscores _ are not allowed)
  • Start with an alphanumeric character
  • End with an alphanumeric character

This is due to the fact that <SERVICE_NAME> is used as hostname for the network storage.

Note that changing the name of the service replaces it with a brand new service and all existing data is lost. Back up your data before changing the service.

2. Add the relationship Anchor to this heading

Add the service to your app configuration:

.platform.app.yaml
mounts:
    '<MOUNT_PATH>':
        source: service
        service: <SERVICE_NAME>
        source_path: <SOURCE_PATH>
  • <MOUNT_PATH> is the path to your mount within the app container (relative to the app’s root).
  • <SERVICE_NAME> is the name you defined in step 1.
  • <SOURCE_PATH> specifies where the mount points inside the service.
    If the source_path is an empty string (""), your mount points to the entire service.
    If you don’t define a source_path, Platform.sh uses the MOUNT_PATH as default value, without leading or trailing slashes. For example, if your mount lives in the /my/files/ directory within your app container, it will point to a my/files directory within the service.

Example Configuration Anchor to this heading

Service definition Anchor to this heading

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
network-storage:

    type: network-storage:2.0
    disk: 256

App configuration Anchor to this heading

.platform.app.yaml
mounts:
    'my/files':
        source: service
        service: files
        source_path: files

Multi-application usage Anchor to this heading

If your project contains multiple apps, they can all use the same network mounts. If the source_path is the same for both apps, the files are shared between the two applications even if the mount location is different.

It’s also possible to have one app mount a source_path that’s a subdirectory of another application’s mount. For example:

app1:

.platform/applications.yaml
# The name of the app container. Must be unique within a project.
app1:
    # The location of the application's code.
    source:
        root: "/"
    ...
    mounts:
        'web/uploads':
            source: service
            service: files
            source_path: uploads

# The name of the app container. Must be unique within a project.
app2:
    # The location of the application's code.
    source:
        root: "/"
    ...
    mounts:
        'process':
            source: service
            service: files
            source_path: uploads/incoming
        'done':
            source: service
            service: files
            source_path: uploads/done

In this example, app1 has access to the entire uploads directory by writing to web/uploads. app2 has two mounts that it can write to: process and done. The process mount refers to the same directory as the web/uploads/incoming directory does on app1, and the done mount refers to the same directory as the web/uploads/done directory on app1.

Worker instances Anchor to this heading

When defining a worker instance, keep in mind what mount behavior you want.

local mounts are a separate storage area for each instance, while service mounts can be shared between instances.

For example, you can define a network storage service:

.platform/services.yaml
# The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
files:
    type: network-storage:2.0
    disk: 2048

You can then use this service to define a network_dir network mount and a local_dir local mount, to be used by a web instance and a queue worker instance:

.platform.app.yaml
# The type of the application to build.
type: "nodejs:20"

# Define a web instance
web:
    locations:
        "/":
            root: "public"
            passthru: true
            index: ['index.html']

# Define how much space is available to local mounts
disk: 512

mounts:
    # Define a network storage mount that's available to both instances together
    'network_dir':
        source: service
        service: files
        source_path: our_stuff

    # Define a local mount that's available to each instance separately
    'local_dir':
        source: local
        source_path: my_stuff

# Define how much space is available to local mounts
disk: 512

# Define a web instance
web:
    locations:
        "/":
            root: "public"
            passthru: true
            index: ['index.html']

# Define a worker instance from the same code but with a different start
workers:
    queue:
        commands:
            start: ./start.sh

Both the web instance and the queue worker have two mount points:

  • The local_dir mount on each is independent and not connected to each other at all and they each take 1024 MB of space.
  • The network_dir mount on each points to the same network storage space on the files service. They can both read and write to it simultaneously. The amount of space it has available depends on the disk key specified for the service configuration (in this case, 2048 MB).

How do I give my workers access to my main application’s files? Anchor to this heading

The most common use case for network-storage is to allow a CMS-driven site to use a worker that has access to the same file mounts as the web-serving application. For that case, all that’s needed is to set the necessary file mounts as service mounts.

For example, the following .platform.app.yaml file (fragment) keeps Drupal files directories shared between web and worker instances while keeping the Drush backup directory web-only (as it has no need to be shared). (This assumes a Network Storage service named files has also been defined in .platform/services.yaml.)

.platform.app.yaml
# The type of the application to build.
"php:8.3"

relationships:
    database: "db:mysql"

disk: 1024

mounts:
    # The public and private files directories are
    # network mounts shared by web and workers.
    'web/sites/default/files':
        source: service
        service: files
        source_path: files
    'private':
        source: service
        service: files
        source_path: private
    # The backup, temp, and cache directories for
    # Drupal's CLI tools don't need to be shared.
    # It wouldn't hurt anything to make them network
    # shares, however.
    '/.drush':
        source: local
        source_path: drush
    'tmp':
        source: local
        source_path: tmp
    'drush-backups':
        source: local
        source_path: drush-backups
    '/.console':
        source: local
        source_path: console

# Crons run on the web container, so they have the
# same mounts as the web container.
crons:
    drupal:
        spec: '*/20 * * * *'
        commands:
            start: 'cd web ; drush core-cron'

# The worker defined here also has the same 6 mounts;
# 2 of them are shared with the web container,
# the other 4 are local to the worker.
workers:
    queue:
        commands:
            start: |
                cd web && drush queue-run myqueue                

How can I migrate a local storage to a network storage? Anchor to this heading

There is no automated way of transferring data from one storage type to another. However, the process is fundamentally “just” moving files around on disk, so it’s reasonably straightforward.

Suppose you have this mount configuration:

.platform.app.yaml
mounts:
    web/uploads:
        source: local
        source_path: uploads

And want to move that to a network storage mount. The following approximate steps do so with a minimum of service interruption.

  1. Add a new network-storage service, named files, that has at least enough space for your existing files with some buffer.

    .platform/services.yaml
    # The name of the service container. Must be unique within a project.
    files:
        type: network-storage:2.0
        disk: 1024
  2. Add a new mount (new-uploads) to the network storage service on a non-public directory. (Remember the source_path can be the same since they’re on different storage services.)

    .platform.app.yaml
    mounts:
        web/uploads:
            source: local
            source_path: uploads
        new-uploads:
            source: service
            service: files
            source_path: uploads
  3. Deploy these changes. Then use rsync to copy all files from the local mount to the network mount. (Be careful of the trailing /.)

    rsync -avz web/uploads/* new-uploads/
  4. Reverse the mounts. Point the web/uploads directory to the network mount instead. Commit and push the change, testing to make sure the network files are accessible.

    .platform.app.yaml
    mounts:
        old-uploads:
            source: local
            source_path: uploads
        web/uploads:
            source: service
            service: files
            source_path: uploads
  5. Clean up. First, run another rsync just to make sure any files uploaded during the transition aren’t lost. (Note the command is different here.)

    rsync -avz old-uploads/* web/uploads/

    Once you’re confident all the files are accounted for, delete the entire contents of old-uploads. If you don’t, the files remain on disk but inaccessible, just eating up disk space needlessly.

    Once that’s done you can remove the old-uploads mount and push again to finish the process You are also free to reduce the disk size in the .platform.app.yaml file if desired, but make sure to leave enough for any remaining local mounts.

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